shelf by shelf 16 – philosophy

So much read, so much forgotten. In addition to “History & Philosophy of Science” (HPS) and “Computer Science”, I also majored in Philosophy. Clearly, I was very much the professional student. While I enjoyed arguing and discussing ideas and working them through, ultimately I ended up being dissatisfied with philosophy itself. That became truer the more studied HPS (or History & Philosophy of Science) as I came to see Philosophy being about ideas and less about the framework in which ideas were being discussed. A chunk of HPS was about situating philosophy, or natural philosophy, within broader societal developments. Philosophy made more sense to me when I could situate it within the politics and history in which particular ideas were expressed ie not dealing with ideas in isolation.

As part of HPS, I read quite a bit of Foucault, and recall liking him quite a bit. Some books on these shelves, and also the history shelves, are actually books I inherited from my father. I’ve never read Hegel and dad seemed to have only vols 2 and 3. Terry Eagleton however was an old favourite that I happily inherited from dad. Eagleton is an old marxist academic and the only thing of his I’ve read is his novel, Saints and Sinners about a fictional meeting between Ludwig Wittgenstein, Nikolai Bakhtin, James Connolly and Leopold Bloom.

I recall reading a bit of it at dad’s place and asked him if I could borrow it. Turns out he’d borrowed it from someone else and had to ask them first if he could loan it to me. Which he did, and I read it, loved it, and returned it. When dad died, the book was still in his collection and it remains unclear whether he had bought his own copy or had never got round to returning his friend’s copy.

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