parental reminders

I commented the other day about objects that remind me of my parents. A couple of friends, Kathryn and Rachel, have picked on that and posted their memories.

Karl Marx

Now there’s a name. A significant name, a philosopher, author of The Communist Manifesto and Das Kapital, a leader. I read the manifesto a long time ago and other writings here and there. Dad read a lot of his stuff and had many of his books. In the 70s, my dad started out a baptist minister, became an atheist in the middle and joined the communist party and at some point moved from communism to socialism. He read a lot and talked a lot, discussing his ideas and thoughts.

Marx

From a young age, I can remember the colourful display of Marx books on the shelf together. I wouldn’t say it’s my earliest memory of him but it’s possibly a constant of sorts in my life of knowing dad. I could spot that little row of books and I knew I was in dad’s space. I have toyed with different ideas for displaying them though none carried out as yet. Many years back, I liked the idea of sticking them together as a block in a perspex box to hang on the wall. That idea of moving them from textual works to an art of sorts seems appropriate given the nature of my memory of their physicality. Taking that a step further, I have also considered sticking them together, slicing off the spines and framing them as a single, flat, colourful strip. For now they sit in a glass cabinet alongside the whisky.

For mum, memories are different. She was more of an introvert and a bit of a hoarder perhaps or more that sense of thrift of her parents passed down, the idea of not tossing things that could be useful. Her favourite takeaway was from the local red rooster: two pieces of chicken and chips. Even when she was in the nursing home, we would take that in for her on her birthday. These takeaway meals usually included cutlery and moist wipes. When cleaning out the old house, we found lots and lots of plastic forks and packets of wipes. Though I don’t think I have any in the drawer myself, plastic forks remain a visual reminder of my mother.

I continue to be fascinated by the sense of being the melting pot of my parents: a thing from her, a thing from him. This thing I am has all those things though not necessarily in the same measures.

iso lunches

Back in March, we started to get things ready in anticipation of going into lockdown and work from home at some point. At the encouragement of my partner, I bought a pair of comfy sneakers so I could get some regular exercise (sort of successful) and even a haircut kit (with shaving heads of various sizes) so that I could continue to have haircuts at home. I don’t have a lot of hair and usually visit a barber for a number 4 head shave every 6-8 weeks. 3 months into iso and I haven’t actually used that kit yet and now have about 4 months of growth. It doesn’t look good, it’s not comfortable, and worse, I have occasionally bumped the volume button of my hearing aids, when patting down my hair. I suspect there will be a haircut in the near future and I reckon that’s not a bad idea.

When lockdown was finally announced, I was able to pop into work on the first day and grab my computer and a few other things. I then remembered the one thing I couldn’t prepare for: what to do about lunch. I’m not a fab cook, or food prepper; I usually get lunch from one of the takeaway food halls near the office. That option disappeared with lockdown. A few months prior we had moved house too and no longer had easy access to a bunch of takeaway places.

Takeaway containers

There are two places around the corner, a few minutes walk away. One fancy and one basic, both Chinese. I love Chinese but a bit of variety would have been nice, some Indian perhaps, Thai, Japanese and so on. Oh well. So Monday to Friday, I pop into the basic Chinese place and grab a meal to take home. Over 3 months, I have worked through almost all of their lunch menu and have a bunch of favourites. I usually try and have at least one new dish a week. They are the main people I see apart from my family on a daily basis and if I ever return to the office I will miss them.

We occasionally get a takeaway meal from the fancy place too, usually to coincide with virtual trivia hosted by the guy who ran the pub trivia we used to go to. It’s been nice to have his face and voice beaming into our home. I miss the pub visits though and hanging out with friends. While the sound is better at home, I’d rather have physical company and not hear half the stuff; the warmth of people and incidental humour.

an old wishlist

I have had an amazon account for many years dating all the way back to 2007. My early days perhaps of online ordering. I remember being amazed at how cheap books were compared to book prices in Australia. It reminded me a little of my overseas trips in 1999 and 2000 from each of which I came home with lots of books. Indeed I have old recollections of book reviewers noting in their articles of trips to the UK being a chance to buy lots of books, some of which were never available here, and all much cheaper there than here.

For a long time the Australian book market was something of a closed shop with high prices charged which you only realised if you were lucky enough to be afford a trip overseas. The opening of online sites for purchasing books overseas changed things and I think ultimately has meant book prices here have dropped significantly. Scary times for a while with local bookshops closing.

Trawling back through my blog to that year of 2007, I found an account of my desire to purchase the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary. At the time, given a favourable exchange rate (about 86 cents to the AUD) I was able to purchase the leatherbound edition from Amazon for about AUD$270 altogether. It was selling locally for $1,000. I don’t say this to single out oxford as many publishers seemed to be doing the same thing. I think the Shorter did drop to around $3-400 locally some years later.

I don’t buy much from Amazon these days, and while I like to check booko for comparison pricing, both new and secondhand, for new stuff at least, I tend to buy locally from Booktopia. Pre-lockdown I would also buy books in person from the likes of Better Read Than Dead and Abbey’s.

My wishlist on Amazon remains, and has around 170 or so entries, dating all the way back to 2007. Entries have disappeared as I’ve purchased them either from Amazon or elsewhere. One thing I liked about Amazon’s system is that it would remind me if I had already purchased a book – this was important as I didn’t always remember and there was a period of some years when most of my books were in boxes and I couldn’t easily tell if I had a title or not. If I purchased a book elsewhere I would eventually get round to manually removing it from Amazon.

Shelf 15 - a little mad

I don’t intend to list every book I listed as I suspect that would be a little dull so I will try and do something of a potted selection. Onward to 2007 when Library 2.0 was in full swing and the oldest book in my list was:

  • Social Software in Libraries: Building Collaboration, Communication, and Community Online by Meredith Farkas – I think I have this now though it might be on desk at work.
  • Teaching Web Search Skills: Techniques And Strategies Of Top Trainers – Greg Notess – I vaguely recall reading posts of his but never got round to getting the book
  • Information Trapping: Real-Time Research on the Web by Tara Calishain
  • The Origins of Modern Science by Herbert Butterfield – I have a secondhand copy of his work “The Whig Interpretation of History” which I read when I was studying for my HPS major. When I did my library Master’s, I created an index for it.
  • Laboratory Life: The Construction of Scientific Facts by Latour and Woolgar – more HPS stuff
  • A History of Natural Philosophy: From The Ancient World To The Nineteenth Century – Edward Grant – a strong writer in the field
  • On Tycho’s Island: Tycho Brahe, Science, and Culture in the Sixteenth Century by John Robert Christianson – never did get round to buying this though I studied quite a bit on Brahe.
  • Cellarius Atlas (Harmonia Macrocosmica of 1660) by Robert van Gent – I had a bit of a fixation with atlases at the time, also listed for 2007 is the Atlas Maior
  • A Guide to the Oxford English Dictionary by Donna Lee Berg – that entry was added to the list a couple of weeks after I purchased the Shorter Oxford

The wishlist for 2007 was a mix of my interests at my time: Library 2.0, History & Philosophy of Science, and dictionaries, 23 books listed in all.

A list of things to write

Some years for #blogjune, I maintain a list of notes and phrases, bits of writing semi formed, reminders, subjects, random ideas passing through my mind. Sometimes I remember to go through the list looking for things to flesh out, or ideas. One of the items is to simply blog about the list itself and in listing, perhaps add a little.

  • A Gentleman in Moscow – a book, perhaps an interesting quote. I have a quote in mind that in turn points to other thoughts
  • My amazon wishlist – I rarely buy from there these days, preferring booktopia and small presses. The wishlist remains a curious sort of bookmarking over time: why this book, why that one?
  • “official” hashtags – and perhaps typos for other conversations
  • Dad’s collection of books by Marx as a visual reminder of times with dad
  • plastic forks as a reminder of Mum
  • collectivitis and when it gets out of hand…too many books, whaddya mean?
  • how many boxes does an author take – notes on moving house
  • post modern earth – worlds like Shannara which are set against a backdrop of the modern earth being the ancient ruins amongst which folk roam. Other examples include The Last of Us, Horizon Zero Dawn, books by GR Kesteven (a childhood memory)
  • what I like about special editions: ribbons and leather, fonts and colour, slipcases, solidity. Perhaps even getting custom slipcases made…
  • …segue toward 17th century, or thereabouts, practices around book binding…where the books were sold with the expectation that the owner would have them bound according to their needs.
  • highlight nice books from my collection – seems pertinent in the age of lockdown when I can have but few friends over. To be honest, even in the old days, I tended not to show and tell, as friends are not about possessions.
  • “2 tarts on a couch” a sculpture – this one is challenging, emotive, full of history, and particularly of my dad. It’s an interesting sculpture, with a certain cheekiness that encouraged reaction and response; dad loved watching how people responded to it: being caught between instinct and shock, followed by a sense of “how I should respond” vs “how should I be seen to be responding”. It’s a work that is a little discomforting. It has been a cardboard box for many years and I am not the right person to display it.

the usual cuppa

Coffee. Some days I need a cup in the morning, some days I don’t. Regardless of need it remains a nice habit to have a warm drink at my side as I work. Other parts of that routine is the buying or the making, and the pathways one follows: mentally, physically, perhaps in rare moments, metaphorically.

A thing I miss working from home, is the morning stroll from the station in Martin Pl, across Macquarie St, waiting forever for the lights to change. Pre coffee 90 seconds of standing at the crossing takes much, much longer. Crossing and sauntering between sandstone buildings as I wander on to the grounds of the eye hospital, out the back, opposite the fountain (which was not running in summer though it remains a grand sight), to the cafe in the courtyard. The same staff, Italian I think. They greet me, we humour each other, though they have more to say than I. This is ever my lot.

I visited the other day. I had to pop into work, to the building. I parked nearby and though running later than planned, I stopped by and ordered my usual. They were still there, still going, carrying on: convivial, relaxed, friendly. A retreat from the world.

a little of the tireds

Weirdly it feels like it’s been a long, hard week. Yet I only worked four days, Monday being a public holiday. Work wasn’t stressful though there was plenty to do. Spent a chunk of today in a rather exhausting task of chasing down 31 order numbers for a single invoice. Was happy to get them as a single invoice as in years gone by they were many. But still a bit of work, particularly as I would normally check the print file for what was used the year before. This time round, it was a combo of email archive trawling, system lookups, and cross comparisons, trying not to get lost in the sea of open windows.

This year everything is a little different and I’ve been occasionally surprised at where I have been dependent on print resources for a job that is otherwise mostly online. This is one such time however and decided to add a section to my annual budget spreadsheet for order numbers. I use the sheet as a template every year for tracking payments and such, it makes good sense to have the key data in one place. I am remain wary of the cult of spreadsheets where everything ends up in many spreadsheets in many places. However in this instance at least I think it will streamline one of the more manual aspects of my job.

I had hoped to give myself an early mark today and instead worked my longest day of the week. June is a funny month with the end of financial year looming round the corner, ever present in everything I do. It can be fun and tiring and interesting and boring…and occasionally quiet though mostly not.

sff sorta

Yesterday was the official start of the Sydney filmfest…online version. Wednesday night is also the night of our weekly online trivia with friends so we decided to stick with that and watch some shorts afterwards. Famous last words.

I was curious how it was going to work and the FAQ supplied by the fest was a little light on detail. I initially tried casting from my new laptop to the TV and could not find the TV on the network. Then tried running it on my android phone and still couldn’t cast and the phone browser for the SFF site wanted me to download the SHIFT72 app which I did. Except that the SHIFT72 app didn’t have any SFF content and SFF have confirmed this morning they’re not using SHIFT72 to deliver festival content.

We then tried using the built in browser on the TV itself (the TV is running full android) without success and was again asked to download the SHIFT72 app. Last resort was to try a cabled HDMI connection from my laptop to the TV. Of course my new laptop only supports USB-C so I dug out my old laptop (which mostly works) and used its HDMI connection. Took a bit for the TV to recognise it but we got there in the end and were able to watch a couple of good shorts.

Failure points: me trying to troubleshoot tech issues after a whisky or two meant I got increasingly frazzled. Thinking about it in the light of day, I have a vague recollection that I need to switch on casting on the TV itself prior to casting from the laptop. Will test that this evening. A further thought this morning re USB-C, I do have a USB-C to USB-A converter which means I potentially could plug the new laptop into the USB-A port on the TV. I may even have a USB-A to HDMI converter, if so that could work too though curious as to the effect of having two chained converters.

Troubleshooting network stuff is a little tricky at the moment as I’m running wifi channels on both the old router and the new Orbi mesh setup. The TV is on the old, the laptops are on the new which shouldn’t be a problem as other things work. The new setup is piped off the old router and the plan will be to switch off wifi broadcasting on the old one eventually. I need to keep the old router in play as the Orbi gear doesn’t have a plug option for landline telephones and the old router does.

there is no catchup

Yesterday’s blog title was supposed to be about today’s content but then I went off on a tangent. Perhaps I should try again. I was thinking that I never seem to catchup on all the books I mean to read, tasks I assign myself, movies and TV to watch. All the things, none of things.

I still haven’t got round to watching my box set of The Avengers. I am reading a bit more. I am behind on Masterchef and filmfest is about to start. If I get behind on masterchef, I made a conscious decision not to catch up and simply accept that I missed some shows. I remember having an increasingly large collection of VHS tapes, back in the day, of shows taped that I meant to watch. I recall we were able to buy blank tapes fairly cheaply which simply meant that more stuff got taped without ever getting watched.

Peter Pan

It was interesting to read back through this post from 2018 on things I’d get round to on holidays and see where I’m at now:

  • watch Twin Peaks – still hasn’t happened
  • Install internet mesh – finally did this a couple of weeks ago and it’s running fab
  • fix TV cabling – we did fix it eventually. Then we moved house and set things up differently. The PVR is refusing to play nice but catchup services are better these days. Also, I have new hearing aids and I can indeed use them with the TV and it’s made a big difference – did take a bit of work to balance the sound so that I could hear the TV and chat to the fam
  • enjoy life – so far so good
  • visit Bankstown Library – this happened and it was lovely and I got to see old friends and colleagues once more
  • web archiving tools – conference in NZ in 2018 was fab. Haven’t played with tools much lately and I want to play with jupyter notebooks too.
  • watch the last Tomb Raider – managed it eventually and it was ok
  • drive somewhere – this is not happening at the moment for some odd reason :)
  • watch The Avengers – still no
  • sew buttons – almost happened a couple of times but still no
  • listen to my ipod – being doing this more in lockdown
  • do some reading – I seem to be reading daily which is a plus

as behind as always

Time passes both faster and slower. Last week, I could have sworn it was week 11 of lockdown but perhaps I miscounted. Counted again today and this week 11. I’m keeping my fingers crossed that next week is week 12. I’d like to think that’s not too optimistic.

I went into the physical library today which I think is my first time since the start of lockdown. I needed to look at the history of a renewal in a physical file to make sure I hadn’t missed anything. Happily, my email archive covered what was in the print so all was well. There was a special deal for parking in The Domain so I booked in for a 2 hour time slot. Ended getting in later than I wanted to, then spent 20 odd minutes driving around in the carpark, looking for a spare spot to park my car. Was successful eventually but only had an hour left to do what I needed. Next time, I might try public transport afterall as it seems less stressful with less reliance on time limits :-)

bitumen

It was nice to say hi to the few folk that were there. Even tidied up my desk a little. A small miracle.

shannara marches on

Somewhat timely that we finished watching season 2 of The Shannara Chronicles on netflix shortly after the limited edition of book 4 arrived in the mail. I remember finding the original trilogy in paperback a long time ago in a secondhand bookshop in Sydney’s CBD, possibly Ashwood’s. There used to be several clustered down near Goulburn St.

2020-06-07_05-10-00

I recall Ashwood’s had a bunch of SF on display down in the back righthand corner and piles on the shelves beneath. I would studiously go through each of those piles looking for interesting titles and so it was that I first read Shannara, a trilogy initially, then as more books were published I ended up with 12 in a mix of secondhand and new, mass paperback and trade. Trade paperbacks were about the same size as hardcovers and of better quality than the regular mass paperback.

I think I lost track at some point, or moved on, perhaps lost interest. Looking at wikipedia, I see there’s over 20 now. A specialist press, Grim Oak, has been publishing nicer editions with hardcover, slipcase, placeholder ribbon, not to mention signed matching numbers for around US$100 each. Pricier than a new release but not stupid money either. As each has arrived, I have been re-reading them. I enjoyed the first and second again though found the third a little slow going. The writing was ok and the story a little reminiscent of the third book of the Lord of the Rings, in that sense of “would you please hurry and get to the end”. That’s possibly an apt comparison as Shannara was often seen as bit of a ripoff of the Tolkien books though these days, many things are.

A thing I liked about the Shannara books was that they seemed to be set in a post apocalyptic earth. This world contained remnants of buildings and technology, odd science and tracings of 20th century life; a fantasy world modelled over an actual world, that sense of back to the farm and disconnected communities. That was one thing I did like about the TV series that it really brought that sense of overlapping worlds to the fore though I found the dialogue and story progression rather laboured and forced.